The quest to make every game matter

in Yardwork by

As the NBA All-Star game dutifully concluded a few weekends ago in New Orleans, an alarm went off among certain persons involved in the NBA.  This product was particularly bad.

A 192-182 shoot around was not the same product of the 80’s and 90’s where the NBA All-Star game on Sunday night on NBC was just something you watched. You would see the dunks and ally-oops, but there were stretches of actual basketball being played.

Meanwhile, as baseball hosts the World Baseball Classic in the coming weeks, a somewhat contrived form of Olympic baseball, where players may or may not direct origin from the country they represent, many are wondering why it can’t have more meaning.

The ironic current cultural reality is that as we have thousands, if not hundreds of thousands of different media sources (counting websites) and there is no shortage of media and entertainment to consume. Yet people are grasping for more meaningful events. An exhibition cannot be an exhibition simply anymore.

This was also apparent in spring training. In a not too distant time. About 15 years ago, you simply didn’t see your big league team on TV while they were in Florida or Arizona. The production trucks and crew and announcers simply weren’t there. Who would watch day baseball exhibitions in the middle of March to make it economically feasible. With the advent of DVR and many of us whose work schedule’s free us up in the daytime anyhow, it now becomes feasible for many, many, many more spring training games to be live television events.

The NFL and NBA are no different. The once strong line between exhibition and regular season is quickly fading as you see the commentary regarding performance and TV marketing of preseason games look almost exactly like the regular season product.

Call it old-fashioned but the year long baseball, football, basketball season, has the opposite effect of its intention. As we try to pump more and more out of sports the less meaningful they become.